SharePoint 2013

SharePoint 2013 Lab Build – Part 1 – Getting Started

This eight-part series of blog articles will detail out the steps necessary to complete the installation of a 100% fully featured SharePoint 2013 virtual machine.  The steps range from the installation of Windows Server 2012 and configuration of the Domain Controller and DNS, SQL Server 2012 setup, and SharePoint 2013 installation. This blog post is very similar to a SharePoint 2010 lab build dating back to early 2010.

Each blog article covers a different portion or logical component of the lab itself, starting with downloading all of the necessary files. While useful information is presented in each part, the intention is for the sections to be completed in order.

SharePoint 2013 Lab build – 8 Part Series

 

Getting Started

To get started, download or acquire the ISOs for:

These files are large so it is less likely to fail mid-download when using the Microsoft Download Manager, which works best with Internet Explorer.

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Once installed, SharePoint 2013 will be fully functional.

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Get started with the Windows Server 2012 installation in SharePoint 2013 Lab Build Part 2!

SharePoint 2013 Lab Build – Part 2 – Windows Server 2012 Installation

This article describes the steps necessary to create a new Windows Server 2012 instance on VMWare Fusion, followed by the configuration of Active Directory, DNS and IIS.

Note that HyperV, VMWare Fusion, or any other virtualization software that supports Windows Server 2012 as a guest will suffice.

 

SharePoint 2013 Lab build – 8 Part Series

 

Table of Contents

 

Create the Virtual Machine and Install Windows Server 2012

Open VMWare Fusion and create a new virtual machine.

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Follow the wizard to configure the virtual machine.

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Select the Windows Server 2012 ISO file downloaded from Microsoft in Part 1 of this series.

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VMWare does not have a Windows Server 2012 guest configured. Therefore, install as Windows 7 x64 and the installation should proceed without issue.

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Apply the Windows product key.

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Configure the hardware specifications for the virtual machine.

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The virtual machine is now ready to be created.

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If the first option is chosen, Windows Server 2012 will be installed without a user interface. Select the second option.

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Success! Windows Server 2012 is now installed.

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Add Roles and Features

Open Server Manager and select Add roles and features.

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Start by adding the Active Directory Domain Services role.

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Allow the necessary role services and features to be installed.

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Add the remaining roles to the server:

  • DNS Server
  • Remote Desktop Services
  • Web Server (IIS)

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This is absolutely not necessary but it may be useful.

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Choose some optional components for Remote Desktop Services.

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Accept the default IIS roles.

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Begin the installation.

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Review Installed Components

Review the newly installed server

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All of the items appearing in red in Server Manager will need to be addressed.

Before configuring Active Directory, rename the server to “SP2013”.

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After restarting the server, step through the actions required (identified by red boxes).

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Ignore this message for the time being.

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Review that the configuration options are correct.

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The Administrator account is required to have a password set.

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Go back to Server Manager > Dashboard.

Select Tools > Computer Management.

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Set a password for the Administrator account.

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Go back to the Active Directory Domain Services Configuration Wizard, then click Previous to re-run the prerequisite check.

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Click Next to re-run the prerequisite check.

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The prerequisite check will pass with warnings. Currently, the machine does not have a static IP, which is absolutely not allowed in a real production domain.

Active Directory Domain Services is now ready to be installed.

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The server will reboot during the install process, which is understandable because the machine is changing from a relatively unsecured workgroup environment to a domain controller, where security is of utmost importance.

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After rebooting, Server Manager will re-open.

Note that there will still be red dashboard items that the server would like addressed, but after closer inspection, most errors are “Manageability” related to BPA (Best Practice Analyzer).

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The less important issues are related to Services, which simply have not been started for Remote Desktop Services and Local Server.

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Enable Remote Desktop.

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Run Windows Update

Check for Windows updates.

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Install the updates and allow the machine to restart.

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Shut down the virtual machine and take a bloody snapshot.

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Windows Server 2012 is now installed on the virtual machine!

 

Continue onto SharePoint 2013 Lab Build Part 3 to install SQL Server 2012.

SharePoint 2013 Lab Build – Part 3 – SQL Server 2012 Installation

This article describes the steps to install and configure SQL Server 2012 on Windows Server 2012 from permissions management to the installation and configuration process to creating a SQL alias for use as the core to a SharePoint 2013 lab. During the install, the latest version of SQL Server 2012 was downloaded from Microsoft.com as an ISO disk image, which was mounted to VMWare using VMWare’s native capabilities.

Note that this article is intended for installation in a development environment and should only be used as reference material. This guide should not be used for a production SQL server installation.

 

SharePoint 2013 Lab build – 8 Part Series

 

Table of Contents

 

Create the Service Account

Create a SQL service account to run SQL.

Naviagate to and open ADUC.

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Create the  SQL service account, SQLService, under the Managed Service Accounts organizational unit (OU).

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Install SQL Server 2012

Mount the SQL Server 2012 ISO and run the installer.

Note that if SQL Server 2012 was downloaded as an executable, the file can simply be copied to the server and run.

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Select the file from the download location.

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Run setup.exe.

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Create a new SQL Server stand-alone installation.

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It is not unusual to see warnings. Errors, identified in red, will need to be addressed before moving forward.

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Choose the setup role to install SQL Server Features, which are the components of SQL Server itself.

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Select the items that will be useful on the development box. Not all items are required and many, other than the core Database Engine Services, can be left unchecked.

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Scroll down and select additional features as needed. Client tools should be checked unless the SQL Server will be managed remotely.

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The installer will validate the environment against the selected features.

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Update the target install location as needed.

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Specify the appropriate service account to run each feature. Some features that run using local or built-in accounts will be greyed out.

In a development environment, it is not unusual for all of these accounts to run under a single account, such as SQLService.

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Add the current user, the Administrator, and/or Enterprise Admins. In addition, only allow Windows Authentication Mode (this can be changed later).

Enterprise Admins are a useful group to grant access to SQL and SharePoint itself as it can provide immediate blanket access to resources for users logged in using their closely guarded Enterprise Account. With that said, membership to the Enterprise Admin group should be closely guarded and managed.

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Grant the same users access to Analysis Services

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Install reporting services but do NOT configure it at this time. If the environment will host SQL Reports in “integrated mode”, then the reporting server needs to be configured after SharePoint.

Note that integrated mode allows SQL Server Reporting Services Reports to “live” within SharePoint instead of being published and managed by the reporting server.

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Review the installation plan.

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Success!

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Configure a SQL Alias

After installation, it is important to configure a SQL Alias for SharePoint. This allows SharePoint to point to a local SQL Server, then be re-homed to point to an external SQL server at a later point without having to run complicated migrate server commands.

Click on the start menu the start typing the letters “CliConfg.

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Enable TCP/IP.

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Create a SQL Alias so that SharePoint 2013 can be pointed to a different machine in the future.

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Shut down the virtual machine and take another snapshot.

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Continue onto SharePoint 2013 Lab Build Part 4 to configure security.

SharePoint 2013 Lab Build – Part 4 – Security Configuration

Probably the most critical and overlooked portion of SharePoint installation is security. Without a well thought out security strategy and a plan of action, it is likely that SharePoint 2013 will not behave as expected and users will receive unexpected login prompts while administrators will be denied access to areas where they should have access.

In this article, baseline security sufficient to run a SharePoint lab, but still “least privileges” ready, is demonstrated using three accounts.

 

SharePoint 2013 Lab build – 8 Part Series

 

Table of Contents

 

Configure Security Accounts

The accounts configured for SharePoint 2013 include:

  • ExpertAssist\SPAppPool – Responsible for running SharePoint’s web applications and the SharePoint timer.
  • ExpertAssist\SPAdmin – The administrative user capable of managing the farm settings. More than likely, this user will also be used for development.
  • ExpertAssist\SPSetup – The setup user with DBCreator and SecurityAdmin roles on the SQL Server.
  • ExpertAssist\Ulysses – An end user.

Logging into a server using Remote Desktop is the more common way of interacting with a server. In this session, instead of logging into VMWare, use Remote Desktop.

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If the server name does not respond, try the IP address.

In the example below, the command ipconfig is run in the server’s PowerShell window to retrieve its IP address. From there, use the host’s Remote Desktop Connection to connect to the server.

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Login as the domain administrator that has rights to add new users.

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Open the Start Menu.

The Start Menu will appear when the mouse is held over the bottom left corner of the screen.

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Open the Administrative Tools.

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Launch Active Directory Users and Computers.

If it fails to load, be sure to login as a user with sufficient rights to manage users, such as Administrator.

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Create a new users under Managed Service Accounts.

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Create the SPAppPool account.

This account will run SharePoint’s timer service and will serve as the application pool account for the IIS websites.

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Create a new user called SPAdmin.

This user will be responsible for day to day operations in SharePoint and it can also be used for development using Visual Studio 2012. This account will NOT be used to install SharePoint.

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Create the SPSetup account.

This account will be used to install SharePoint. This account will have local administrative access on the server and will also have dbcreator and securityadmin rights on the SQL Server itself.

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One of the requirements for SPSetup is that it needs local admin rights to the machine where SharePoint is to be installed. Because this is a domain controller, however, there is no Local Administrators group option, therefore the SPSetup needs to be added to a group with similar rights, such as Domain Admins.

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Open ADUC and click on Domain Admins.

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Add SPSetup to Domain Admins.

PLEASE DO NOT DO THIS IN A PRODUCTION ENVIRONMENT!

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Grant Right to SQL Server

Login to SQL Server Management Studio.

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All apps will appear. Click on SQL Server Management Studio.

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Right mouse key on the icon and then pin it to the taskbar.

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Connect to the SQL Server (local).

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Create a new login. This step grants the windows service accounts rights to the SQL Server.

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Create a new login for SPAppPool.

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Before installing SharePoint, log out of the Administrator account and log back in as SPSetup.

 

After doing so, continue onto SharePoint 2013 Lab Build Part 5 to install SharePoint 2013.

SharePoint 2013 Lab Build – Part 5 – SharePoint Server 2013 Install

In this session, the star of the party, SharePoint Server 2013 gets installed. It is important to download the latest version from Microsoft.com, especially if RTM has been released, as it is often difficult to upgrade from a release candidate to RTM.

The steps shown in this article are unique to the environment, VMWare, and the errors and version installed at the time of this writing, therefore, take care to adjust or retry as needed based upon possible differences in the software and environments utilized. Furthermore, this article does show much with respect to security, the logged-in user, and provides explanations with respect to accounts but it is important to not transpose these recommendations to a production environment

 

SharePoint 2013 Lab build – 8 Part Series

 

Table of Contents

 

Begin Installation

Login to the server as SPSetup

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Switch to VMWare and mount the SharePoint 2013 ISO.

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Switch back to Remote Desktop with SPSetup logged in and run the installer.

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Close the window and run prerequisiteinstaller.exe.

 

Install SharePoint Server 2013 Prerequisites

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Log back in as SPSetup and re-run the prerequisite installer.

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Install SharePoint Server 2013

Re-run setup.exe.

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Reboot the server and log back in as SPSetup.

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Ensure the current user is SPSetup.

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Restart setup.exe.

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Enter the product key.

If it is a trial license then Microsoft will have sent an email containing the trial key.

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Success!

Uncheck the box to run the SharePoint Products Configuration Wizard and close the dialog box.

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Configure SharePoint 2013

Run the SharePoint 2013 Products and Configuration Wizard from the Start Menu.

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Note that instead of referencing the current machine, the database server references the spsql alias created during the SQL installation.

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The SQL server is not available.

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In this test, the SQL server had not started after the reboot. If this occurs, locate Services and manually start the service.

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Success!

The installation now advances if the SQL Server is available. Enter a passphrase.

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Switch to SQL Server Management Studio and connect to the SQL Database Server.

Right mouse key on the database server.

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In the server properties window, select Advanced and specify a value for Max Degree of Parallelism to equal or be greater than the number of CPUs for this virtual machine (this may range from 2-4 depending on the number of CPUs).

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User does not have appropriate rights. Log back into the server as Administrator or an Enterprise Administrator (since we provide Enterprise Administrators with ServerAdmin rights on the SQL Server).

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(Screenshot below while logged in in as ExpertAssist\Administrator in a different session – note that the screenshot is from VMWare, not Remote Desktop)

Set the Max Degree of Parallelism as a user that has serveradmin rights on the SQL Server.

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Switch back to the SPSetup Session and restart the SharePoint 2013 Products and Configuration Wizard.

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Switch to SQL Server Management Studio and delete the WSS_Config database, which is the core to any SharePoint server farm.

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Return to the SPSetup session and complete the wizard.

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Login to Central Administration

Login to Central Administration (this might not work).

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The SPAppPool runs SharePoint so it should have access. Unfortunately, it appears that IIS is unable to authenticate the SPAppPool user when you are attempting to login on the server itself.

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Try logging in as SPSetup after reopening the browsers.

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Success!

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Also try http://localhost:8080 – it is good to make sure default localhost access is available.

Note that using http://localhost:8080 will automatically send the current users credentials to IIS, thus the user is signed on without having to enter credentials. In this case, because SharePoint was installed as SPSetup and because the current logged in user is SPSetup, the browser automatically logs the user in as SPSetup.

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It is important to login remotely from the host as well. Try logging in to http://sp2013:8080 instead.

Note that 8080 was the port specified for Central Administration when installing SharePoint.

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Try from the host (in this case Chrome is used to make it clear we are logging in from the guest). We can’t use localhost in this case because that would not point to the SP2013 server. Instead, use http://sp2013:8080.

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If the incorrect credentials are used, SharePoint 2013 has a tendency to remove passwords. To force a logout, use http://sp2013:8080/_layouts/15/SignOut.aspx by appending _layouts/15/SignOut.aspx to the URL the close and reopen the browser.

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Enter credentials.

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Success!

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Update Farm Administrators

Before moving forward, users must be added to the farm’s administrator group. Click on Manage the farm administrators group.

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During the creation of the new farm, the Application Pool (ExpertAssist\SPAppPool) and the Setup Account (ExpertAssist\SPSetup) are automatically added to the farm administrators group.

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Add the appropriate users.

In this lab “Enterprise Admins”, which is a built-in AD security group will be added. In addition, the user ExpertAssist\Ulysses is added.

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Add ExpertAssist\Ulysses, ExpertAssist\SPAdmin, and ExpertAssist\Enterprise Admins (SPSetup could be removed at this point).

Hint: click Alt+K to quickly complete a user’s name.

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Continue to SharePoint 2013 Lab Build Part 6 to configure SharePoint 2013.

SharePoint 2013 Lab Build – Part 6 – SharePoint Server 2013 Configuration

n this article, SharePoint 2013 is configured for remote and local access via the URL http://sharepoint/, security and the farm administrators group is defined, and the top level site collection is created.

With SharePoint 2013 installed on Windows Server 2012 with SQL Server 2012 and a 2012 domain controller, SharePoint is now ready to be configured. While the previous installs were relatively routine aside from a few errors, it is not unusual to run into a large number of issues while attempting to configure SharePoint 2013, thus it will take additional troubleshooting and technical savvy to get everything working properly.

 

SharePoint 2013 Lab build – 8 Part Series

 

Table of Contents

 

Create a New Web Application

Note that it is realistic to use the Configuration Wizard to create the root SharePoint site, however, for knowledge and experience purposes, it is more helpful to create these items from scratch.

Click Manage web applications.

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The New button is unfortunately disabled. Instead, log back in as ExpertAssist\SPAppPool.

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Still not able to create a new webapp – this occurred while on and off the server…

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Oddly enough, logging in as ExpertAssist\Administrator does enable the New button.

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Create a new web application.

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In some cases this Silverlight dialog never goes away. If it happens to stick for more than two minutes, close the dialog and click on Web Applications. There is a good chance the web application was created without incident.

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Create a Site Collection

Creating a web application is not sufficient for SharePoint to begin responding to end user requests on port 80. The next step is to create a site collection — more specifically, the “root” site collection.

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Choose the appropriate web application at the top, then provide a name and URL for this top level site

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Specify the team site template and provide the SharePoint Admin and the dev users as the site collection administrators.

Note that ExpertAssist\Ulysses will be the primary development user.

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Success!

Note that http://sharepoint will not load because no Alternate Access Mappings (AAMs) and Host Headers in IIS have been configured. Furthermore, no hosts or DNS entry exists to tell Internet Explorer where to look for the site on the SP2013 server.

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Configure the Alternate Access Mappings

Next configure alternate access mappings so that vanity URLs such as http://sharepoint/ can be used to access the site.

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Click on Edit Public URLs.

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Change the mapping collection to SharePoint – SharePoint80.

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Add http://sp2013 to the custom zone.

These zones are somewhat arbitrary other than the Default zone, which is supposed to be the default URL for referencing objects. Adding a mapping for the server http://sp2013 is useful for “backdoor” access to the web app.

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Visit http://sp2013 and the team site should load, but it doesn’t because there is still a default IIS website listening on port 80.

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Configure Internet Information Services (IIS)

Launch Start > Administrative Tools > Internet Information Services (IIS) Manager.

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Unfortunately, two websites are attempting to listen to port 80 (the default internet port). The first is the Default Web Site, which comes by default with IIS, and the second is the newly created SharePoint – SharePoint80 website. In order for IIS to properly send the port 80 requests to SharePoint – SharePoint80, the Default Web Site has to be deleted or disabled.

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Restart IIS.

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After refreshing the http://sp2013/, “backdoor” entry to the site an error is displayed but the IIS default message is now gone.

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Create bindings to the SharePoint – SharePoint80 website.

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Add SP2013 to the bindings that already exist.

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Also edit the SharePoint 80 binding to include all IP addresses.

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IIS may show that SharePoint – SharePoint80 is now stopped. Either start or restart the site.

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Refresh IIS to determine if the site started properly.

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Next, refresh http://sp2013 in the browser.

Note that http://sharepoint will still NOT work.

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Enter the credentials for a user with Site Collection Administrator permissions (in this case ExpertAssist\SPAdmin or ExpertAssist\Ulysses).

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Success!

SharePoint 2013 is up and running.

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Configure DNS

In order for the server to resolve http://sharepoint to the local machine, a DNS entry needs to be added to the server. To open the DNS Manager click the start button then start typing “DNS”

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Expand forward lookup zones to the domain (ExpertAssist.com).

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Right mouse key on the canvas and create a New Alias (CNAME).

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Next, refresh http://sharepoint (on the server) and a dialog box will appear requesting the user’s credentials. Enter a user who has site collection administrator rights (in this case ExpertAssist\SPAdmin or ExpertAssist\Ulysses).

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Because the server doesn’t trust the URL, add the site to the Trusted Sites zone. Unfortunately, in Windows Server 2012, this is not an easy task because URLs in the Trusted Zone must be https. Open Internet Options and add the URL to the Trusted Sites if it is not possible to add it from the dialog prompt that appears during login.

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Success!

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Configure Remote Access From Host Machine

If the trusted sites prevent adding, then the domain policy may prevent users from adding non-secure sites to Trusted Sites. If this is the case, simply access http://sharepoint remotely instead of attempting to load it directly on the server. On the host machine, http://sharepoint will not work because the URL does not resolve. In order to get http://sharepoint to resolve to the server, create an entry in the client’s host file.

In Windows 7, open C:\Windows\System32\drivers\etc\ and locate the hosts file. Make a backup and copy the editable version to the desktop.

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Using Command Prompt or PowerShell, use the command ipconfig to determine the server’s IP address.

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Edit the host file accordingly.

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Replace the file in C:\Windows\system32\drivers\etc with the editable copy of the host file (it is not possible to edit the file in place under standard Windows 7 security).

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Test using Chrome.

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Success!

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Shut down the virtual machine and take a snapshot.

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Continue onto SharePoint 2013 Lab Build Part 7 to install Visual Studio and SharePoint Designer.

SharePoint 2013 Lab Build – Part 8 – Windows Azure Workflow Installation and Configuration

Table of Contents

 

Prerequisites

Download and install the “Azure Workflow Installer” per the article “How to: Set up and configure SharePoint 2013 workflows” (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj163276(v=office.15).aspx). This will enable SharePoint 2013 workflows in SharePoint Designer 2013. Otherwise, SharePoint Designer 2013 is relegated to SharePoint 2010-based workflows.

Note that in a production environment, a dedicated user should be created for Azure Workflows.

  • Download and install the latest version of Azure Workflow Installer: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=252092
  • Grant the RunAs and SPSetup accounts the serveradmin role on the SQL server. This role can be revoked after installation to keep in line with least privileges.
  • Login as the RunAs user

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Installation

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Configuration

Log in as SPSetup.

It is very important NOT to login as a basic user for configuration of the workflow. Ensure that the RunAs account that will serve as the workflow service account is a member of the server administrator role on the SQL server, otherwise errors will occur.

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*** Unfortunately, using the spsql SQL alias did not work, so use the FQDN for the SQL server instead.

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The following error will occur if the installation was completed with a user that does not have appropriate rights to the SQL server or local machine.

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[Error] [8/11/2012 2:22:07 AM]: System.Management.Automation.CmdletInvocationException: Could not successfully create management Service Bus entity ‘WF_Management/WFTOPIC’ with multiple retries within timespan of 00:02:05.6870891. —> System.TimeoutException: Could not successfully create management Service Bus entity ‘WF_Management/WFTOPIC’ with multiple retries within timespan of 00:02:05.6870891. —> System.UnauthorizedAccessException: The remote server returned an error: (401) Unauthorized. Authorization failed for specified action: Manage..TrackingId:dfc04846-20b9-403e-aa9c-4716ff97a439,TimeStamp:8/11/2012 9:22:07 AM —> System.Net.WebException: The remote server returned an error: (401) Unauthorized.

at System.Net.HttpWebRequest.EndGetResponse(IAsyncResult asyncResult)

at Microsoft.ServiceBus.Messaging.ServiceBusResourceOperations.CreateOrUpdateAsyncResult`1.EndGetResponse(CreateOrUpdateAsyncResult`1 thisPtr, IAsyncResult ar)

at Microsoft.ServiceBus.Messaging.IteratorAsyncResult`1.StepCallback(IAsyncResult result)

— End of inner exception stack trace —

Server stack trace:

Exception rethrown at [0]:

at Microsoft.ServiceBus.Common.AsyncResult.End[TAsyncResult](IAsyncResult result)

at Microsoft.ServiceBus.NamespaceManager.CreateOrUpdateTopicAsyncResult.CreateDescription(CreateOrUpdateTopicAsyncResult thisPtr, IAsyncResult r)

at Microsoft.ServiceBus.Messaging.IteratorAsyncResult`1.StepCallback(IAsyncResult result)

Exception rethrown at [1]:

at Microsoft.ServiceBus.Common.AsyncResult.End[TAsyncResult](IAsyncResult result)

at Microsoft.Workflow.Management.ManagementEntitiesCreator.CreateManagementEntitiesAsyncResult.EndCreateTopic(IAsyncResult result)

at Microsoft.Workflow.Common.BackoffRetryAsyncResult.IsolateWithRetry(IAsyncResult result)

— End of inner exception stack trace —

at Microsoft.Workflow.Common.AsyncResult.End[TAsyncResult](IAsyncResult result)

at Microsoft.Workflow.Administration.ServiceUpdateManager.CreateManagementEntities(IList`1 namespaceManagerUris, ServiceBusClientCredentialType clientCredentialType, IDictionary`2 arguments, TimeSpan retryTimeout)

at Microsoft.Workflow.Deployment.Commands.WorkflowServiceConfigHelper.SetWFRuntimeSettings(String resourceDBConnectionString, String config)

at Microsoft.Workflow.Deployment.Commands.AddWFHost.CallWFRuntimeSettings(Service wfserviceInfo)

— End of inner exception stack trace —

at System.Management.Automation.PowerShell.EndInvoke(IAsyncResult asyncResult)

at Microsoft.Workflow.Deployment.ConfigWizard.CommandletHelper.InvokePowershell(Command command, Action`2 updateProgress)

at Microsoft.Workflow.Deployment.ConfigWizard.ProgressPageViewModel.AddWFNode(FarmCreationModel model, Boolean isFirstCommand)

 

Leave the farm and start the installation again

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Delete all databases that are prefixed with WF and SB.

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Login as the RunAs user that will run Azure.

Ensure the RunAs user has local admin rights and serveradmin role membership on the SQL server.

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The workflow management site will appear in IIS. For firewall purposes the ports 11290 and 11291 should be opened between the SharePoint servers. Make a note of the ports if they are not the standard 11290 and 11291.

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Next, open PowerShell as the administrator and run the following command:

Register-SPWorkflowService –SPSite “http://localhost” –WorkflowHostUri “http://localhost:12291” –AllowOAuthHttp

*** Note that -AllowOAuthHttp can be removed if Azure Workflow was installed as http instead of https.

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Test in SharePoint Designer 2013

Choose the Platform Type after creating a workflow in SharePoint Designer 2013.

If everything is configured properly, the SharePoint 2013 Workflow option will appear.

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